Frequently Asked Questions

What is Kitewing?

Kitewing is a wing shaped kite. Many people call it “the wing” for short, just because of its shape. You can use Kitewing with your skis, snowboard, mountainboard, skates or in-line skates etc. Many say it is like a mix of kite surfing and wind surfing.

Most riders learn to cruise with the wing in half an hour. At the same time there seems to be no limit to the amazing jumps and tricks that are being developed by many keen riders around the globe at the moment: Speeds up to 100 km/h (62 mp/h) and 5 m high, 40 m long jumps on flat surface are not unusual.

We at Kitewing Sports Ltd. believe that the combination of it being easy and challenging at the same time is the reason for the rapidly growing popularity of this new action sport.

What is the difference between dacron and monofilm?

Dacron is a non-transparent material, which is easier to pack, since you can roll the sail around the rig and don’t need to remove the sail from the rig and is therefore more popular for example in rental use. Monofilm is a bit more responsive material (the sail does not stretch). The downside of monofilm is that you need to remove the sail from the rig.

Why should I use Kitewing instead of other traction gear?

The Kitewing is easier to learn and handle than windsurfing or kitesurfing gear. It’s also very safe for the people around, since there are no lines. The wing is also TOTALLY depowerable, since you have direct control to the wind. Compared to windsurfing rigs a Kitewing covers easily 4 windsurfing sail sizes (which often requires two different masts). Compared to powerkites, a Kitewing covers around 2-3 kite sizes. The Kitewing does not pull you sideways such as a windsurfing sail, but gives you pull that is a bit upwards, so you never carry the sail you pull it a bit downward.

Can I use a harness?

Yes, almost all kinds of windsurfing or kitesurfing harnesses work well. We offer harness lines that are a bit longer than windsurfing lines and the v-line is something that you can’t get from windsurfing or kitesurfing companies.

Is sailing a Kitewing safe?

As with any sport, there are risks involved and precautions such as protective equipment, where you chose to go sailing and good judgement are advised. However, since Kitewing is not attached to the rider, it can simply be ‘released’ to disengage the rider. More experienced riders can also steer into or out of the wind to control their speed, but a simple rule of thumb is ‘Drop it to Stop it!’

Model Chart

KW Matrix FAQ

Which wing should I buy?

Your choice depends on ability and where or how you plan to sail. Folks comfortable on skis or
skates who can skate backwards and ski with hands over head could sail under a big wing
presuming some sailing or flying experience.
Folks who are complete novices to the winter ice and snow sailing scene should start with a
SK8.

The 7.0 is for experienced wing sailors. It is not recommended for a first wing.
As conditions get slippery and wind velocities pick up it takes less wing area to have fun. The
curves cross. It is possible to sail with a SK8 sail on snow with skis if the wind is blowing and
the surface is hard transformed corn. It is also likely that if the conditions are sticky and the
wind is light that you will be unable to sail with the big wing.
I am older now. My favorite all around wing is the 4.6. On ice with blades on my feet I am not
likely to put down my 3.0. Some folks like the 4.8 for all around performance. Some swear by
the 5.5 Dacron. The old 5.5 Pro is the wing most of us cut our teeth on. Kitewing offers two
versions of the 5.5 wing.

The 5.5 Dacron is a great versatile wing which can be used on either the standard frame or the
stiff performance frame which is stock with the 5.5 Speed package. The 5.5 Dacron can be
stowed on the frame. Full batten sets work well with the 5.5 Dacron. Full battens can be
purchased separately from Kitewing.

The 5.5 Speed is a performance package meant for racing. the wing is very light relative to
wing area. The stiffer carbon front tubes promote a quicker response to velocity and control
inputs as well as maintain shape under higher loads. If you consider the Speed you should also
consider a full batten set in addition to the stock battens. Its likely you also possess a soft
standard frame which works great with the Speed sail.
It used to be I would advise folks to buy the biggest wing they could afford. Recent product
development is aimed at lighter higher aspect ratio wings which may prove to be a significant
performance advantage. The lighter the wing is relative to wing area the easier it is to sail in
very light air. It remains to be seen whether or not higher aspect ratios make that much
difference to a Kitewing sailor. Well see.

Dicky Saltonstall